Welcome & Posting Guidelines!

Welcome to our class blog for Foundations of Art, Design, and Digital Culture!

You will be expected to post on here once a week before each Monday class. Your posts should relate to something we are talking about in class. They can range anywhere from design, painting, photography, sculpture, performance, composition, fashion, video, architecture, and theory.

Guidelines:
1. Two-three sentences per post. You always can write more if you feel moved to do so.
2. Include link to the article, artist, audio, or video you are sharing.
3. Please make sure to also include a FEATURED IMAGE on your post.
4. These are due once a week, with the cycle starting and finishing each Monday.
5. By the end of the semester you should have a minimum of 12 posts.

Some good art/design blogs to check out are:
https://www.booooooom.com/
https://hyperallergic.com/
https://www.thisiscolossal.com/
http://www.thisismirador.com/
https://blog.adafruit.com/
https://www.artforum.com/
http://www.twocoatsofpaint.com/
https://brooklynrail.org/
https://www.theartblog.org/

Picture: Tauba Auerbach, Color Atlas, 2011

3 Comments Add yours

  1. ksjackso says:

    2-20-20
    https://www.booooooom.com/submissions/its-too-late-for-postacrds/

    I really like this painting, not only for its attention to detail and contrast of colors, but for its meaning as well. It combines something as beautiful and intrinsically naturally beautiful as a flower with something manufactured, man-made, artificially shiny, and just as common. The two juxtapose each other in everything they stand for, and yet, the image somehow works perfectly.

    Like

  2. Sharon Chan says:

    This past weekend, I went to Savannah and visited the Owns-Thomas House and Slave Quarters. Its architecture and interior design embedded lots of history of slavery and showed the power dynamic between the rich and the poor through the juxtaposition of the royal portraits and the old wooden furniture.

    Like

  3. gfossett says:

    Pour painting is a popular technique where paint is thinned and allowed to flow and swirl across a canvas. Beyond color choice, the artist doesn’t have a lot of control over what the final piece will look like. This makes it a good tool for beginners to experiment with abstraction without needing a lot of technical practice (even I have made a pour painting before lol)

    I saw this piece on reddit. The artist painted a face that blends in with the acrylic pour, and I think the effect is really cool!

    Like

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